Averting teenage pregnancy

Don’t give in to peer pressure. Many teenagers can feel left out/behind when their friends start to have boyfriends, or start having sex. Those who have started to do these things early can often talk about it enough to make others feel left out. However, if you do stand your ground and wait until you know you are ready, you will be glad of it. It means you’ll have waited for the right person and the right time.Everyone develops at different rates, both physically and mentally, so don’t feel that you should be racing your peers for things like having sex and getting boyfriends.

  Many of your peers will regret their choices in time. Others could even be lying. Don’t just start having sex because other people are if you aren’t ready to do it yourself.

Learn to say “No”. This includes saying no to anything you feel uncomfortable with. Whether it’s refusing to have a boyfriend, have any kind of physical contact, have sex or have sex without protection, there is nothing wrong with standing up for yourself. The only 100% safe way to avoid pregnancy is to not have sex, so you shouldn’t feel stupid for not wanting to go through with something.

Pulling out carries some risk of pregnancy. Studies show that typical use of withdrawal has a 18% chance of resulting in pregnancy.[1] This is because some sperm may be released in the male’s pre-seminal fluid, or simply because the male doesn’t pull out quickly enough.

Unprotected anal sex by itself cannot result in unwanted pregnancy.[2] But because the anus and the vagina are extremely close to each other, there is a chance that sperm could accidentally leak into the vagina, causing pregnancy. Unprotected anal sex carries with it an increased likelihood of STIs, especially HIV/AIDS.

Oral sex cannot result in pregnancy. As long as the penis does not come in contact with the vagina, there is no possibility that oral sex can lead to unwanted pregnancy.[3] The likelihood of transmitting some STIs, however, is increased with oral sex.

http://m.wikihow.com/Avoid-a-Teenage-Pregnancy

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